Video Production

Video Production

We provide high quality video production at an affordable cost, bringing a journalistic eye and creative flair to all our projects. We can help you master your online video presence with content that gets you noticed...

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Why your people need to be your social media advocates

Yes Coke, it is about storytelling – but don’t forget your own people  So, the press release is dead. Long live the viral video. The corporate website – for consumer brands at least – may also have had its day. That’s the recent headline grabbing prediction of Coca Cola’s digital communications chief Ashley Brown. “Content is king”, apparently (think we might need a moratorium on this phrase!) and the company’s future communication efforts won’t be focusing on the mass media but on ‘storytelling’. So, more good news for the public relations profession. And also for the numerous journalists struggling to find work these days – brand journalism may be your saviour. The company makes plenty of valid points about the end of one way communication – and the need to be ‘authentic’ and ‘transparent’ in the online world. Oh and don’t forget to not take yourself too seriously. I think Coca Cola has absolutely got the focus right. Consumers probably aren’t interested in engaging with brands via corporate websites. And, yes, the best route to (increasingly short span) audience attention probably is via a short, snappy video that people want to share with their friends. Don’t care but want to share Brown says: “How do I package up (an) announcement as a story that someone who doesn’t work at Coke and doesn’t care would want to share with friends?” he said. Now, for a global consumer brand with the awareness levels of Coke, those who ‘don’t work for’ the company probably aren’t the critical catalysts which will get the viral ball rolling. But for (almost) everyone else, we’d do well to include our own people in our storytelling efforts. An organisation’s own employees should be part of the advocacy effort – they should be our fans, our subscribers and our followers too. Too many organisations see social media in particular as a distraction for employees. It’s something they do in their lunch hour – or perhaps even on their phones when they nip off for a ‘screen break’ to the loo. But I think this approach may be missing a trick. Everyone should be part of the storytelling effort. It doesn’t have to be a distraction from your organisational objectives – it can be integral to them. Here’s some quick tips: Put in place clear social media guidelines and advice to staff. Build some time in for formal training...

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The Green PR Agency launched today

I’ve launched a new pr agency today dedicated to the environmental and sustainability sectors. Here’s the website…  http://www.thegreenpragency.co.uk/ The Green PR Agency will provide specialist pr and copywriting services to businesses and organisations working in the following areas: Low carbon / carbon reduction technologies Renewable energy Micro-renewables CHP, micro CHP solar hot water, solar pv Wind turbines, wind energy Biomass Ground source heat pumps; air source heat pumps Energy efficiency Energy from waste; fuel from waste Waste management and recycling Sustainable development Green building, green architecture Mark Lupton Communications will continue to provide general public relations and copywriting services. Please let me know what you think of the new agency via the contact us section of the...

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PR: making the web less scary

Sometimes the internet can be a scary place. A lot of this stems from the sheer size of it – literally billions of web pages, blogs, Twitter comments and Facebook posts. In the old days pr was simple enough: there was radio, television and the print media. Formulate a coherent message, choose the medium and decide the balance between advertising and public relations. Easy enough. (By the way, don’t be fooled into thinking these old communications channels have gone away!) So when it comes to developing an effective social media strategy one of the first questions you have to ask is: where do I start? A recent CIPR webinar I participated in around public affairs and social media offered some reassuring thoughts for anyone feeling overwhelmed by the web. Delivered by pr, social affairs and corporate communications specialist Stuart Bruce the webinar offered a powerful analysis on the impact social media is having on all aspects of public affairs. Whether it’s businesses looking to protect their reputations or policy makers looking to develop effective initiatives the world of social media is transforming the way we operate. Bruce’s take was refreshing and reassuring: a lot of what’s out there on the internet doesn’t matter, he concludes. The trick is identifying what does matter and focusing your attention on that. “You have to shrink the space down and focus on the bits that matter to you,” says Bruce. “Monitor those that can have the biggest impact on your business.” In a crisis management situation or if your corporate reputation is at risk you have to show you’re doing something, that you have an action plan in place and are taking steps to promote your stance on an issue. Stuart cited the ‘Dell Hell’ customer service fiasco which hit the computer giant recently and which threatened to become a public relations disaster. The approach to crisis management in the age of social media was to rank the conversations which were taking place and decide which were worth taking action on. “It’s about deciding what’s worth taking action on – and which are the things you don’t want to take action on or which things may be counterproductive to do so,” adds Bruce. That’s a fine art surely and isn’t something which can be done by a computer alone. Monitoring social media, and responding to it, is a nuanced, subjective, and delicate task....

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Using Facebook and Twitter to promote brands

Not great news for the social media brand evangelists today. The Huffington Post reports that 61% of UK consumers don’t want to engage with brands via social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter. I found it surprising to be honest that such a large percentage do. Let’s face it – Facebook is where we go to tell our friends what we’re up to, and to find out what’s going on in their lives. Brands who barge in on that are going to come a cropper. The only recent ‘engagement’ I can think of was clicking on a link to get a free Boots voucher, which turned out to be Primark (huh?). There’s nothing like a decent ‘freebie’ to get people to like or share. So if you’re asking yourself how do I promote my brand using social media, or how do I use social media for pr, tread carefully. Remember, people aren’t going onto social networks to like your brand or to share your brand with their friends. They’re on there for a specific reason, and they don’t want you to elbow in on the action. On the other hand if you can use social media to provide consumers with great content – you might have more success. Join in, participate and listen to what customers say. Also, ask yourself: are we doing this for the sake of it or because it will genuinely help us achieve our business goals? Like any other marketing or pr activity, social media must justify itself. Can it help you increase sales, retain or attract employees, lower your costs, raise your profile or improve your customer service offering. There are certainly ways it can, but if it genuinely can’t, why...

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